Blog entries about Royal Blind Learning Hub

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Picture of Learning Hub
by Learning Hub - Monday, 11 December 2017, 11:47 AM
Anyone in the world

This week's sign is "Goodnight."

Rub two fingers down forehead and nose.

On-body signing is a technique used to communicate with people with multiple disabilities and visual impairment. The Royal Blind School in Edinburgh developed a form of on-body signing called Canaan Barrie.

A different sign will be posted on our blog each week. Come back next week to see a new sign.

[ Modified: Monday, 11 December 2017, 11:48 AM ]
 
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by Learning Hub - Monday, 27 November 2017, 10:14 AM
Anyone in the world

This week's sign is "Please."

Flick fingers under chin and bring hand forward in short gesture.

On-body signing is a technique used to communicate with people with multiple disabilities and visual impairment. The Royal Blind School in Edinburgh developed a form of on-body signing called Canaan Barrie.

A different sign will be posted on our blog each week. Come back next week to see a new sign.

 
Picture of Gareth Peevers
by Gareth Peevers - Tuesday, 21 November 2017, 9:31 AM
Anyone in the world

Tutora Best Educational Blog 2017 awards badgeWe're delighted to announce that the Royal Blind Learning Hub has been selected to be featured in Tutora's "The Best Educational Blogs 2017" list, as selected by Tutora's readers.

The 50 must follow Educational Blogs (opens in new window)

[ Modified: Tuesday, 21 November 2017, 9:35 AM ]
 
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by Learning Hub - Monday, 20 November 2017, 10:38 AM
Anyone in the world

This week's sign is "Walk."

Stamp feet.

On-body signing is a technique used to communicate with people with multiple disabilities and visual impairment. The Royal Blind School in Edinburgh developed a form of on-body signing called Canaan Barrie.

A different sign will be posted on our blog each week. Come back next week to see a new sign.

[ Modified: Monday, 20 November 2017, 10:39 AM ]
 
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by Learning Hub - Monday, 13 November 2017, 10:00 AM
Anyone in the world

This week's sign is "Again."

Tap fist twice on opposite upper arm.

On-body signing is a technique used to communicate with people with multiple disabilities and visual impairment. The Royal Blind School in Edinburgh developed a form of on-body signing called Canaan Barrie.

A different sign will be posted on our blog each week. Come back next week to see a new sign.

[ Modified: Monday, 13 November 2017, 10:41 AM ]
 
Anyone in the world

By Lauren Lockhart, Languages Teacher, Royal Blind School.

Read part 7 of the blog.

I attended a training session today about using tactile images in the VI classroom. Very interesting.

Tactile images

So, what is a tactile image? Do 3D printers immediately spring to mind? Or good old-fashioned taxidermy? The use of tactile images has always been difficult for me. I have moved from real objects to signifiers to cut-out cardboard objects, some of which have worked and some of which have really not worked at all. I assumed that a blind child might be able to work out what a rubber toy bat was, but have you tried feeling something like that with your eyes closed? Not easy.

It seems, from this training course, that we have to think very carefully about what we choose to use to represent the meaning of a word and what its purpose will be. Is it relevant to the task? Is it relevant to the learner? Toy trains and planes might seem a very obvious thing to use but do they actually give the child any idea of scale?? Don't you think that a child who has only ever been exposed to a toy might have trouble with an actual plane? Let's not even talk about an elephant...

We always have to consider the pupils prior learning and experience, tactile exploration is only as good as the memory bank of touch they have accumulated. Start with something as close to the real thing as possible? When describing a plane, use the sounds first to give some idea of the scale of the thing. When describing a building, go for a walk as long as the height of it to bring its magnitude to life. When this is firmly understood, then you can move onto the representation of the object: a toy or a model perhaps.

Representations, can be in the form of objects, imprints, textures or tactile images. Tactile images can be made using a Minolta machine, a simple tactile line image. The outline of the image is raised when heated, allowing the learner to trace it. Braille can be added for further clarification. This is, however, an acquired skill, as I learned today when a cupcake seemed to me to be a headless, hump-backed elephant. Make everything as clear as possible and do not solely rely on your vision to produce tactile images (a slightly contradictory but not entirely unnecessary comment). Its purpose should be purely functional not decorative.

How to Create Tactile Graphics (video)

[ Modified: Wednesday, 8 November 2017, 9:20 AM ]
 
Picture of Learning Hub
by Learning Hub - Monday, 6 November 2017, 10:21 AM
Anyone in the world

This week's sign is "Thank you."

Tap chin once and bring hand forward in longer gesture.

On-body signing is a technique used to communicate with people with multiple disabilities and visual impairment. The Royal Blind School in Edinburgh developed a form of on-body signing called Canaan Barrie.

A different sign will be posted on our blog each week. Come back next week to see a new sign.

[ Modified: Monday, 6 November 2017, 10:26 AM ]
 
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by Learning Hub - Monday, 30 October 2017, 10:17 AM
Anyone in the world

This week's sign is "Birthday."

Tap shoulder with opposite fist, twice.

On-body signing is a technique used to communicate with people with multiple disabilities and visual impairment. The Royal Blind School in Edinburgh developed a form of on-body signing called Canaan Barrie.

A different sign will be posted on our blog each week. Come back next week to see a new sign.

[ Modified: Monday, 30 October 2017, 10:18 AM ]
 
Picture of Gareth Peevers
by Gareth Peevers - Thursday, 26 October 2017, 9:25 AM
Anyone in the world

Introduction to Photography Video

Matthew Clark looks through the view finder of his camara

We've added an inspiring new video on photography to the Learning Hub website. Learn how a partially sighted young person uses photography to capture and create memories. Matthew Clark shares information on the cameras and techniques he uses and give some top tips for photography as a partially sighted young person.

Watch the Introduction to Photography video

[ Modified: Thursday, 26 October 2017, 9:36 AM ]
 
Picture of Learning Hub
by Learning Hub - Monday, 23 October 2017, 3:43 PM
Anyone in the world

This week's sign is "Physio"

Stroke hand down opposite arm then grip wrist and pull gently across body.

On-body signing is a technique used to communicate with people with multiple disabilities and visual impairment. The Royal Blind School in Edinburgh developed a form of on-body signing called Canaan Barrie.

A different sign will be posted on our blog each week. Come back next week to see a new sign.

[ Modified: Monday, 23 October 2017, 3:44 PM ]
 
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