Blog entries about Royal Blind Learning Hub

Picture of Learning Hub
by Learning Hub - Monday, 27 August 2018, 10:23 AM
Anyone in the world

This week's sign is "Toast."

Tap side of hand in palm of other hand, then draw palm across lower palm away from body.

On-body signing is a technique used to communicate with people with multiple disabilities and visual impairment. The Royal Blind School in Edinburgh developed a form of on-body signing called Canaan Barrie.

A different sign will be posted on our blog each week. Come back next week to see a new sign.


 
Picture of Learning Hub
by Learning Hub - Monday, 20 August 2018, 10:53 AM
Anyone in the world

This week's sign is "Milk."

Rub fist twice on opposite side of body near shoulder.

On-body signing is a technique used to communicate with people with multiple disabilities and visual impairment. The Royal Blind School in Edinburgh developed a form of on-body signing called Canaan Barrie.

A different sign will be posted on our blog each week. Come back next week to see a new sign.


[ Modified: Monday, 20 August 2018, 10:56 AM ]
 
Anyone in the world

By Lauren Lockhart, Languages Teacher, Royal Blind School.

Read part 9 of the blog.

Learning a foreign language as a learner with no or low vision

The great thing about learning a foreign language is that, for the most part, you do not need your vision. You can learn by listening and repeating (audio-lingual method). Modern Foreign Languages, however, have used ‘signifiers’ to learn vocabulary or to question the pupil e.g. is it A or B?. Traditionally, and in the mainstream setting, these ‘signifiers’ have been flashcards or images on a PowerPoint. This is no use to a learner with little or no vision and, to save ‘death by PowerPoint’, these can be in the form of tactile models, tactile images or objects which represent the item of vocabulary.

Signifiers

When teaching the topic of ‘school subjects’, use bells for music, an Eiffel tower or a beret for French and a wooden spoon for Home Economics. When teaching sports, use real sports equipment. When teaching clothes, bring in real clothes. The most important thing to remember when using objects to represent words is to use real objects which the learner will be likely to experience again. They are also much more engaging!

Songs

Songs have always been a great way to remember vocabulary and to engage learners. This is no different with a learner with little or no vision. Just make sure that the song sheet is either in large print or in Braille.

Games

This requires a little more thought and preparation. If you are going to play battleships, your pupils might not be able to see the board. In my next blog I'll be writing about ideas for games in modern foreign languages.

[ Modified: Thursday, 16 August 2018, 12:59 PM ]
 
Picture of Learning Hub
by Learning Hub - Tuesday, 14 August 2018, 12:12 PM
Anyone in the world

This week's sign is "Water."

Rub hand down neck from chin to upper chest.

On-body signing is a technique used to communicate with people with multiple disabilities and visual impairment. The Royal Blind School in Edinburgh developed a form of on-body signing called Canaan Barrie.

A different sign will be posted on our blog each week. Come back next week to see a new sign.

 
Picture of Learning Hub
by Learning Hub - Monday, 6 August 2018, 9:54 AM
Anyone in the world

This week's sign is "Cake."

Tap back of hand with fist once.

On-body signing is a technique used to communicate with people with multiple disabilities and visual impairment. The Royal Blind School in Edinburgh developed a form of on-body signing called Canaan Barrie.

A different sign will be posted on our blog each week. Come back next week to see a new sign.

 
Picture of Learning Hub
by Learning Hub - Tuesday, 31 July 2018, 2:10 PM
Anyone in the world

This week's sign is "Cheese."

Tap fist on opposite forearm once.

On-body signing is a technique used to communicate with people with multiple disabilities and visual impairment. The Royal Blind School in Edinburgh developed a form of on-body signing called Canaan Barrie.

A different sign will be posted on our blog each week. Come back next week to see a new sign.

 
Picture of Learning Hub
by Learning Hub - Tuesday, 24 July 2018, 11:47 AM
Anyone in the world

This week's sign is "Butter."

Stroke fingertips, back and forth as if spreading butter.

On-body signing is a technique used to communicate with people with multiple disabilities and visual impairment. The Royal Blind School in Edinburgh developed a form of on-body signing called Canaan Barrie.

A different sign will be posted on our blog each week. Come back next week to see a new sign.



 
Picture of Learning Hub
by Learning Hub - Monday, 2 July 2018, 11:20 AM
Anyone in the world

This week's sign is "Wet."

Dribble or drum fingers lightly (as in rain sign) on part of body which is wet. For toileting, if child is wet make wet sign on hip.

On-body signing is a technique used to communicate with people with multiple disabilities and visual impairment. The Royal Blind School in Edinburgh developed a form of on-body signing called Canaan Barrie.

A different sign will be posted on our blog each week. Come back next week to see a new sign.


 
Picture of Learning Hub
by Learning Hub - Monday, 18 June 2018, 12:43 PM
Anyone in the world

Last month the Royal Blind Learning Hub ran another of its popular Canaan Barrie Signing Workshops. This event was free for teachers and other professionals involved in teaching children with complex needs and vision impairment.

The participants learnt the skills used in communicating with learners with complex needs and vision impairment using the Canaan Barrie on-body signing system.

You can see photos from the event below.

Feedback included:

"Thank you - inspiring, thought provoking, excellent course. You're a credit to your school. I've loved today."

"I will be able to keep and gain more trust with my class."

"Confidence increased in using signs."

"I have learned some really good strategies to use while working with children with visual impairment which I will share with colleagues."

Female workshop participant wearing a blindfold in coffee shop exercise

Female workshop participant hands exercise cards to her blindfolded colleague

Participants take part in an interactive session in the coffee shop

Work shop attendee guides her blindfolded collegue through the coffee shop

[ Modified: Monday, 18 June 2018, 12:53 PM ]
 
Anyone in the world

By Lauren Lockhart, Languages Teacher, Royal Blind School.

Read part 8 of the blog.

Using an iPad with a VI learner

I was astounded today at the extraordinary rate at which one of my students navigated my ipad. That was the amazing thing – it wasn’t even his, with all his accessibility settings already established. The one thing he asked me to do was to switch on the VoiceOver (Settings > General > Accessibility) and he was ‘away’, as they say in Scotland. He then configured the ipad to his own personal specifications – he preferred not to double click for example - and away he went, swiping the screen (that he couldn’t see) upwards, downwards, left and right. I had asked him to search for a newspaper article in The Scotsman. This requires a few processes to get there – locating the search engine, finding the search tab, typing… I think it would take us all a good while to work out how to type on an ipad with no vision. Well, it seems you hold your finger down until you hear a letter, then move around the keyboard until you get to the letter you want. You then double-click. Don’t ask me how he navigated his way through Google search lists and website headings! It took a great deal of patience on my part not to help him.

It just goes to show that children have the incredible ability to learn new things and they need to be given the freedom and opportunity to do so, particularly for a child with vision impairment. Using your vision will only stall their understanding and their independence. Despite my initial apprehensions about using what is essentially a visual tool with a VI learner, I think the ipad could turn out to be quite useful.

[ Modified: Friday, 15 June 2018, 3:52 PM ]